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We Are Bowie exhibition in Bristol till Sunday

Total Blam Blam's picture
on September 18, 2013

 

“Put you all inside my show”

 

Artist Stephen Collings has been in touch with details of an exhibition he has curated at the Parlour Showrooms in Bristol in the UK, which runs until this Sunday, September 22nd. 

The show includes an incredibly diverse collection of works, with Bowie as the theme, from the following artists: Stephen Collings, Cyril Crentsil, Joseph Kelly, Philip Collings, Joe Wakeman, Jak Flash, Morgan Howell, Incwel, David Collings, Andrew Scaife, Stanley Chow and James George.

You can view many of the beautiful pieces including the compelling and quite bizarre Boyz Keep Swinging film on the dedicated tumblr page.

Also, stay tuned to the davidbowie.com community forum for updates.

We’ll leave you with a bit from the press release...

 

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David Bowie is many things to many people. Gateway to the avant-grade, pioneer of art rock and sexual plurality. Wearer of masks, musician, performer, actor, comedian and fashion icon.

Following on from my 2010 exhibition The Importance of Being Vincent dedicated to my own ‘fan art’ of Vincent Price, I wanted to further explore fan art, and the creative compulsions that turn inspiration into music, art, fashion or performance.

Back in 1997, I attended Turner Prize-winner Jeremy Deller’s exhibition The Uses of Literacy, which comprised art created by fans of Manic Street Preachers. Beyond idolatry, these pieces expressed nascent independent creativity where the artist - the inspiration - were curators. The fans were both audience and creators, each bringing their own identities, experiences and desires into play. We are at once constant, yet unknowing collaborators in art, and arguably no other artist as much as David Bowie has displayed the art of the possible.

Certainly few other modern artists can claim to such a cultural ripple effect, whether it be the New Romantics of the 80s, acolyte Britpop bands of the 90s or modern pop such as Lady Gaga, whose branding owes much to Bowie’s cross-cultural transgressions in the 1970s and beyond.

This project gained momentum as Bowie sprung back into popular consciousness this year with a new album and the timely V&A exhibition, David Bowie Is, heralding die-hard, brand new and transitory fans alike to pick up plectrums, paintbrushes, pencils and pins.

The V&A exhibition set a challenge - If Bowie is a catalyst for art, for the obscure and the new, condensed for a new audience, then where next for this creative exchange? The works displayed in this exhibition are merely a microcosm, a ripple, but also perhaps a love letter to an artist who continues to challenge and inspire.

 

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blog image: 
    18 September 2013
    We Are Bowie exhibition in Bristol till Sunday

     

    “Put you all inside my show”

     

    Artist Stephen Collings has been in touch with details of an exhibition he has curated at the Parlour Showrooms in Bristol in the UK, which runs until this Sunday, September 22nd. 

    The show includes an incredibly diverse collection of works, with Bowie as the theme, from the following artists: Stephen Collings, Cyril Crentsil, Joseph Kelly, Philip Collings, Joe Wakeman, Jak Flash, Morgan Howell, Incwel, David Collings, Andrew Scaife, Stanley Chow and James George.

    You can view many of the beautiful pieces including the compelling and quite bizarre Boyz Keep Swinging film on the dedicated tumblr page.

    Also, stay tuned to the davidbowie.com community forum for updates.

    We’ll leave you with a bit from the press release...

     

    + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + - +

     

    David Bowie is many things to many people. Gateway to the avant-grade, pioneer of art rock and sexual plurality. Wearer of masks, musician, performer, actor, comedian and fashion icon.

    Following on from my 2010 exhibition The Importance of Being Vincent dedicated to my own ‘fan art’ of Vincent Price, I wanted to further explore fan art, and the creative compulsions that turn inspiration into music, art, fashion or performance.

    Back in 1997, I attended Turner Prize-winner Jeremy Deller’s exhibition The Uses of Literacy, which comprised art created by fans of Manic Street Preachers. Beyond idolatry, these pieces expressed nascent independent creativity where the artist - the inspiration - were curators. The fans were both audience and creators, each bringing their own identities, experiences and desires into play. We are at once constant, yet unknowing collaborators in art, and arguably no other artist as much as David Bowie has displayed the art of the possible.

    Certainly few other modern artists can claim to such a cultural ripple effect, whether it be the New Romantics of the 80s, acolyte Britpop bands of the 90s or modern pop such as Lady Gaga, whose branding owes much to Bowie’s cross-cultural transgressions in the 1970s and beyond.

    This project gained momentum as Bowie sprung back into popular consciousness this year with a new album and the timely V&A exhibition, David Bowie Is, heralding die-hard, brand new and transitory fans alike to pick up plectrums, paintbrushes, pencils and pins.

    The V&A exhibition set a challenge - If Bowie is a catalyst for art, for the obscure and the new, condensed for a new audience, then where next for this creative exchange? The works displayed in this exhibition are merely a microcosm, a ripple, but also perhaps a love letter to an artist who continues to challenge and inspire.

     

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