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TND in Quietus and Rolling Stone mid-year reports

Total Blam Blam's picture
on July 01, 2013

 

“Halfway gladness, dazzled by the new”

 

David Bowie’s triumphant return to the fray, The Next Day, has been placed in the mid-year favourite albums list of both The Quietus and Rolling Stone magazine.

The 27th Bowie studio album is #2 in the very impressive Quietus list, illustrating how the excellent online review site still stands by the words written by Chris Roberts for their original review of the album.

Here are the concluding words from that review:

 

David Bowie, then. History, but still happening. And the next day, and the next. Greatness. It can’t go on. It goes on.

 

Rolling Stone has shown similar appreciation in their “unranked list of the year's best so far”.

Again, here’s the concluding paragraph from their original review by Rob Sheffield:

 

There are loads of musical and lyrical references to his past, as Bowie broods over the places he's gone and the faces he's seen. But he's resolutely aimed at the future. And when he hits the delirious heights of "The Stars (Are Out Tonight)," he makes the future sound irresistible. 

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    1 July 2013
    TND in Quietus and Rolling Stone mid-year reports

     

    “Halfway gladness, dazzled by the new”

     

    David Bowie’s triumphant return to the fray, The Next Day, has been placed in the mid-year favourite albums list of both The Quietus and Rolling Stone magazine.

    The 27th Bowie studio album is #2 in the very impressive Quietus list, illustrating how the excellent online review site still stands by the words written by Chris Roberts for their original review of the album.

    Here are the concluding words from that review:

     

    David Bowie, then. History, but still happening. And the next day, and the next. Greatness. It can’t go on. It goes on.

     

    Rolling Stone has shown similar appreciation in their “unranked list of the year's best so far”.

    Again, here’s the concluding paragraph from their original review by Rob Sheffield:

     

    There are loads of musical and lyrical references to his past, as Bowie broods over the places he's gone and the faces he's seen. But he's resolutely aimed at the future. And when he hits the delirious heights of "The Stars (Are Out Tonight)," he makes the future sound irresistible.