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Paul Morley is talking about David Bowie

Total Blam Blam's picture
on March 02, 2013

“We had a friend, a talking man”

Paul Morley has written a fine piece in the Review section of today's Daily Telegraph.

Here‘s an excerpt from it.

“WHEN I was a 15-year-old David Bowie fan in 1972, Bowie was for me a kind of teacher, so much more inspiring and motivating than my real teachers. In the middle of a mundane, mainstream world that limited possibility, his explosive mind and the way he represented it through sheer otherness suggested everything was possible. He was the human equivalent of a Google search, a portal through which you could step into an amazing, very different wider world – if he mentioned in an interview, or referenced in his work, someone like Andy Warhol, Jean Cocteau, Antonin Artaud or Marcel Duchamp, I would immediately want to find out what he was talking about.

He flooded plain everyday reality with extraordinary, unexpected information, processing the details through a buoyant, mobile mind, and made intellectual discovery seem incredibly glamorous. He helped create in my own mind a need to discover ways of making sense of both the universe and the self by seeking out the different, the difficult and the daring.

David Bowie is about to be as much at the centre of attention as he was in his Seventies prime, still taking people to new places, still using entertainment as an unlikely form of education. There will not be much sight of the actual, living David Bowie. But everyone who has an opinion – which these days is close to everyone – will be telling us about their version of David Bowie, their love, hate or indifference, while the real Bowie observes with some amusement from somewhere else, conceptually choreographing glorious, subversive show-business heat with Zen-master grace.

He will keep his distance, refusing to be interviewed, refusing to engage in sales talk and idle gossip, easily avoiding the sharing, multitasking, desperate need to stay visible of the modern celebrity, inspired by stars like him, but lacking the troubling and truly mysterious artistic dimension. He will be invisible, in current orthodox terms, but he will be everywhere. ”

Check out the full article if you get a chance, it‘s well worth a read.

blog image: 
    2 March 2013
    Paul Morley is talking about David Bowie

    “We had a friend, a talking man”

    Paul Morley has written a fine piece in the Review section of today's Daily Telegraph.

    Here‘s an excerpt from it.

    “WHEN I was a 15-year-old David Bowie fan in 1972, Bowie was for me a kind of teacher, so much more inspiring and motivating than my real teachers. In the middle of a mundane, mainstream world that limited possibility, his explosive mind and the way he represented it through sheer otherness suggested everything was possible. He was the human equivalent of a Google search, a portal through which you could step into an amazing, very different wider world – if he mentioned in an interview, or referenced in his work, someone like Andy Warhol, Jean Cocteau, Antonin Artaud or Marcel Duchamp, I would immediately want to find out what he was talking about.

    He flooded plain everyday reality with extraordinary, unexpected information, processing the details through a buoyant, mobile mind, and made intellectual discovery seem incredibly glamorous. He helped create in my own mind a need to discover ways of making sense of both the universe and the self by seeking out the different, the difficult and the daring.

    David Bowie is about to be as much at the centre of attention as he was in his Seventies prime, still taking people to new places, still using entertainment as an unlikely form of education. There will not be much sight of the actual, living David Bowie. But everyone who has an opinion – which these days is close to everyone – will be telling us about their version of David Bowie, their love, hate or indifference, while the real Bowie observes with some amusement from somewhere else, conceptually choreographing glorious, subversive show-business heat with Zen-master grace.

    He will keep his distance, refusing to be interviewed, refusing to engage in sales talk and idle gossip, easily avoiding the sharing, multitasking, desperate need to stay visible of the modern celebrity, inspired by stars like him, but lacking the troubling and truly mysterious artistic dimension. He will be invisible, in current orthodox terms, but he will be everywhere. ”

    Check out the full article if you get a chance, it‘s well worth a read.